Online Dental Education Library

A periodontist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of problems that affect the gums and other supporting tissues of the teeth. If you want to keep your teeth for life — a completely reasonable goal in this day and age — you need to make sure the tissues that surround them are also healthy. Should gum problems arise, you may need periodontal therapy to restore diseased tissues to health. Learn more about Periodontal Disease & Therapy.

Treatment of Gum Disease

Treating gum disease starts with the removal of any plaque and hardened deposits (tartar or calculus) on the tooth root surfaces. This may be followed by other non-surgical treatments and/or periodontal surgery to remove diseased tissue and restore your mouth to the best possible health.

Implant Dentistry

Dental Implant Video

If you are missing one or more teeth, dental implants offer the comfort and security of a permanent replacement that looks and functions just like your natural teeth. Dental implants also help preserve the tooth-supporting bone in your jaw that deteriorates when even one tooth is lost.

Cosmetic Gum Surgery

The gum tissue that surrounds and supports your teeth plays a big role in how appealing your smile will look. Excess gum tissue, gum recession, and an uneven gum line are all problems that can often be successfully treated surgically at the dental office. Learn more about Cosmetic Gum Surgery.

Gum Grafting

If gum recession is affecting your health or your appearance, a routine surgical procedure called gum grafting may help. It involves carefully placing a small amount of new tissue in an area where little or no gum tissue currently exists — typically recommended to prevent further gum recession or to help cover tooth root surfaces that have become exposed. Learn more about Gum Grafting.

Tooth Extractions

There are times when it is in your best interest to have a tooth extracted (removed). This could be the case for a variety of reasons, including: damage or trauma to the tooth; extensive gum disease; extensive tooth decay; or overcrowding. Learn more about Tooth Extractions.

Bone Grafting

Bone grafting, a minor in-office surgical procedure, is commonly used in dentistry to correct deficiencies in bone quantity and to build support for teeth or dental implants. Learn more about Bone Grafting.

Sedation Options

We offer a wide array of sedation options for our patients.  We want you to be comfortable for every procedure and are fully Licensed to offer you Nitrous Oxide sedation ( laughing gas), Oral sedation, IV sedation and General Anesthesia. Learn more about  Anesthesia

 

Consequences of Tooth Loss.

Often, people who are missing teeth look older than they really are. The reason is the loss of jawbone that inevitably follows tooth loss.

Bone needs stimulation to maintain its form and density. In the case of the jawbone, that stimulation comes from the teeth, which make hundreds of fleeting contacts with each other throughout the day. The small stresses produced by these contacts are transmitted to the bone, prompting it to regenerate constantly.

When a tooth is lost, the stimulation it provided disappears. In just the first year of tooth loss, there is a 25% decrease in bone width. This is followed over the next few years by an overall 4 millimeters decrease in height. If enough teeth are lost, and as bone loss continues, the distance from nose to chin can decrease and the lower third of the face partially collapses. With a lack of structural support, the lips sag; that's why toothless people often appear unhappy as well as prematurely aged. Extreme loss of bone can also make an individual more prone to jaw fractures.

One may also find that some of the remaining teeth actually shift into the spaces left open by missing teeth. This in turn can cause additional bite problems and even jaw joint (TMJ) pain. Finally, compromised nutrition and poor general health can result if eating healthy foods like raw fruits and vegetables becomes too difficult without teeth.

Now here's the good news: Dental implants — the state-of-the-art tooth-replacement method preferred by dentists — can prevent all this. Besides helping a person without teeth look and feel great again, dental implants actually prevent bone loss. That's because they are made of titanium, which has a unique ability to fuse to living bone. By actually becoming a permanent part of the jawbone, dental implants stabilize and stimulate the bone to maintain its volume and density.

Dental implants are placed during a minor in-office surgical procedure using local anesthetic and then, either immediately or after a healing period, topped with lifelike dental crowns. Together, these precision components look, feel and function exactly like your natural teeth. Dental implant success rates exceed 95% — the highest of any tooth-replacement option. With regular brushing, flossing, and professional cleanings — in other words, the same basic care that natural teeth require — your dental implants should last a lifetime.

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