Online Dental Education Library

A periodontist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of problems that affect the gums and other supporting tissues of the teeth. If you want to keep your teeth for life — a completely reasonable goal in this day and age — you need to make sure the tissues that surround them are also healthy. Should gum problems arise, you may need periodontal therapy to restore diseased tissues to health. Learn more about Periodontal Disease & Therapy.

Treatment of Gum Disease

Treating gum disease starts with the removal of any plaque and hardened deposits (tartar or calculus) on the tooth root surfaces. This may be followed by other non-surgical treatments and/or periodontal surgery to remove diseased tissue and restore your mouth to the best possible health.

Implant Dentistry

Dental Implant Video

If you are missing one or more teeth, dental implants offer the comfort and security of a permanent replacement that looks and functions just like your natural teeth. Dental implants also help preserve the tooth-supporting bone in your jaw that deteriorates when even one tooth is lost.

Cosmetic Gum Surgery

The gum tissue that surrounds and supports your teeth plays a big role in how appealing your smile will look. Excess gum tissue, gum recession, and an uneven gum line are all problems that can often be successfully treated surgically at the dental office. Learn more about Cosmetic Gum Surgery.

Gum Grafting

If gum recession is affecting your health or your appearance, a routine surgical procedure called gum grafting may help. It involves carefully placing a small amount of new tissue in an area where little or no gum tissue currently exists — typically recommended to prevent further gum recession or to help cover tooth root surfaces that have become exposed. Learn more about Gum Grafting.

Tooth Extractions

There are times when it is in your best interest to have a tooth extracted (removed). This could be the case for a variety of reasons, including: damage or trauma to the tooth; extensive gum disease; extensive tooth decay; or overcrowding. Learn more about Tooth Extractions.

Bone Grafting

Bone grafting, a minor in-office surgical procedure, is commonly used in dentistry to correct deficiencies in bone quantity and to build support for teeth or dental implants. Learn more about Bone Grafting.

Sedation Options

We offer a wide array of sedation options for our patients.  We want you to be comfortable for every procedure and are fully Licensed to offer you Nitrous Oxide sedation ( laughing gas), Oral sedation, IV sedation and General Anesthesia. Learn more about  Anesthesia

 

All-on-4 replacement teeth.What do you think of when you hear the word “dentures?” Is it a set of removable teeth that sits in a glass when not in use? That type of removable denture does still exist, but these days there's a far better alternative: Implant-supported fixed dentures.

An implant-supported fixed denture is a lifelike set of false teeth — complete with prosthetic gum tissue — that stays in your mouth all the time. It is securely and comfortably anchored by several dental implants that become an integral part of your jawbone once inserted during a minor surgical procedure done in the dental office.

Implant-supported fixed dentures are ideal for people who have experienced deterioration of the gums and jawbone, which is an inevitable effect of tooth loss. Bone is a living tissue that needs constant stimulation to maintain its volume and density. That stimulation normally comes from the teeth; when they are lost, the bone that used to surround and support them starts to break down. If this is allowed to continue, your facial features may begin to sag — giving you a more aged appearance (View Example). Unfortunately, wearing removable dentures actually accelerates this process; but wearing fixed dentures halts it — while restoring the underlying support to your facial features (cheeks and lips) that your jawbone structure used to provide. This will make you look younger. Learn more about fixed vs. removable dentures.

How It Works

All-on-4 step by step.A dental implant is a small, screw-shaped post that serves as a replacement tooth root. Like a natural tooth root, it is housed in the bone beneath the gum. Implants are made of titanium, which has a unique ability to fuse to bone in a process called osseointegration. That's what makes implants so sturdy and reliable (Learn More).

Today's state-of-the-art implant systems enable a minimum number of implants to support a maximum number of teeth. That means as few as four implants can be used to support a full arch (upper or lower jaw) of fixed, non-removable replacement teeth. What's more, it is sometimes possible to accomplish this remarkable, life-changing process in just one day!

Implant-supported dentures offer a more efficient and cost-effective strategy for permanent tooth replacement than using a single dental implant for every missing tooth, which is impractical and not recommended — particularly where bone loss has occurred. In order to restore the natural proportions of your teeth and gums with less bone volume, we need to create a lifelike prosthesis (replacement) that contains both teeth and gums; otherwise, any permanent replacement teeth would look overly long.

What to Expect

Three-dimensional (3-D) x-rays of your jaw may be taken to pinpoint the location of anatomical structures such as bone, sinuses and nerves. This will enable us to determine how many implants you need and the ideal location for them. For each implant we will need to make a small channel in the bone. You will feel nothing during the implant-placement surgery, which usually requires only local anesthesia. We will discuss your individual anesthesia options with you beforehand and make sure you are comfortable.

Once your implants are in place, we will attach a temporary set of teeth, which stays in your mouth approximately three months until the implants are fully fused to your bone and healing is completed. Because implant surgery is very precise and well-planned, people generally have little post-operative discomfort and begin functioning with their new temporary teeth almost immediately. However, it's a good idea to avoid crunchy, chewy or tough foods for at least six to eight weeks.

When the process of osseointegration is complete, we attach permanent teeth that fit your healed gum tissues more precisely than the temporary ones did. With these teeth you can eat anything you want — and they will look as good as they feel! Your new teeth will require the same care as natural teeth: daily brushing and flossing, and regular checkups and professional cleanings. With conscientious oral hygiene, implant-supported fixed dentures should last a lifetime.

Related Articles

Losing Teeth - Dear Doctor Magazine

The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth For those missing even one tooth, an unsightly gap is actually the least significant problem. What's of far greater concern is the bone loss that inevitably follows tooth loss. Dental implants can preserve bone, improve function and enhance psychological well-being. Learn how implants serve both as anchors to support replacement teeth and preserve bone... Read Article