Online Dental Education Library

A periodontist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of problems that affect the gums and other supporting tissues of the teeth. If you want to keep your teeth for life — a completely reasonable goal in this day and age — you need to make sure the tissues that surround them are also healthy. Should gum problems arise, you may need periodontal therapy to restore diseased tissues to health. Learn more about Periodontal Disease & Therapy.

Treatment of Gum Disease

Treating gum disease starts with the removal of any plaque and hardened deposits (tartar or calculus) on the tooth root surfaces. This may be followed by other non-surgical treatments and/or periodontal surgery to remove diseased tissue and restore your mouth to the best possible health.

Implant Dentistry

Dental Implant Video

If you are missing one or more teeth, dental implants offer the comfort and security of a permanent replacement that looks and functions just like your natural teeth. Dental implants also help preserve the tooth-supporting bone in your jaw that deteriorates when even one tooth is lost.

Cosmetic Gum Surgery

The gum tissue that surrounds and supports your teeth plays a big role in how appealing your smile will look. Excess gum tissue, gum recession, and an uneven gum line are all problems that can often be successfully treated surgically at the dental office. Learn more about Cosmetic Gum Surgery.

Gum Grafting

If gum recession is affecting your health or your appearance, a routine surgical procedure called gum grafting may help. It involves carefully placing a small amount of new tissue in an area where little or no gum tissue currently exists — typically recommended to prevent further gum recession or to help cover tooth root surfaces that have become exposed. Learn more about Gum Grafting.

Tooth Extractions

There are times when it is in your best interest to have a tooth extracted (removed). This could be the case for a variety of reasons, including: damage or trauma to the tooth; extensive gum disease; extensive tooth decay; or overcrowding. Learn more about Tooth Extractions.

Bone Grafting

Bone grafting, a minor in-office surgical procedure, is commonly used in dentistry to correct deficiencies in bone quantity and to build support for teeth or dental implants. Learn more about Bone Grafting.

Sedation Options

We offer a wide array of sedation options for our patients.  We want you to be comfortable for every procedure and are fully Licensed to offer you Nitrous Oxide sedation ( laughing gas), Oral sedation, IV sedation and General Anesthesia. Learn more about  Anesthesia

 

What Is Tooth Decay?

Tooth decay is caused by a variety of things; in medical terms, cavities are called caries, which are caused by long-term destructive forces acting on tooth structures such as enamel and the tooth's inner dentin material.

These destructive forces include frequent exposure to foods rich in sugar and carbohydrates. Soda, candy, ice cream—even milk—are common culprits.  Left inside your mouth from non-brushing and flossing, these materials break down quickly, allowing bacteria to do their dirty work in the form of a harmful, colorless sticky substance called plaque.

The plaque works in concert with leftover food particles in your mouth to form harmful acids that destroy enamel and other tooth structures.

If cavities aren't treated early enough, they can lead to more serious problems requiring treatments such as root canal therapy.

Preventing Cavities

The best defense against cavities is good oral hygiene, including brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing and rinsing. Your body's own saliva is also an excellent cavity fighter, because it contains special chemicals that rinse away many harmful materials. Chewing a good sugarless gum will stimulate saliva production between brushing.

Special sealants and varnishes can also be applied to stave off cavities from forming.

If you have any of the following symptoms, you may have a cavity:

  • Unusual sensitivity to hot and cold water or foods.
  • A localized pain in your tooth or near the gum line.
  • Teeth that change color.

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Baby bottle tooth decay is caused by sugary substances in breast milk and some juices, which combine with saliva to form pools inside the baby's mouth.

If left untreated, this can lead to premature decay of your baby's future primary teeth, which can later hamper the proper formation of permanent teeth.

One of the best ways to avoid baby bottle tooth decay is to not allow your baby to nurse on a bottle while going to sleep. Encouraging your toddler to drink from a cup as early as possible will also help stave off the problems associated with baby bottle tooth decay.